Stuffed Aliens with Phillip Martin
Lesson Plan
Learner Outcomes: ........................ ........................................................................
Line: Experiment with up to eight varieties of lines
  Use line to depict facial expressions
   
Shape: Identify and use different shapes
  Identify and select unrelated shapes and create new shapes out of them
  Use shapes to draw the world around them
   
Texture Understand that texture excites our emotions
  Understand that texture is part of our environment
Materials: 25 sheets of bond paper
  crayons or colored pencils
  rolls of colored bulletin board paper
  scissors
  recycled paper scraps
  glue
  stapler and staples
  shredded paper
   
Vocabulary: Line, Shapes, Texture
   

Introduce the activity by reading Alistair and the Alien Invasion by Marilyn Sadler, or any other book that works for you. After the story is completed, tell the class that they are going to design their own aliens. The creature could be from Mars, Saturn, or a planet they've never heard of.

First they should take bond paper, folded in fourths, and design four possible aliens. It is helpful if they use shapes they are familiar with to create their creature (triangles, circles, ovals, squares and rectangles.) It is important to plan how the alien will look. What kind of textures will be used? Experiment with a variety of lines. When they have four aliens designed, they need to select the one that they want to enlarge.

The aliens will be drawn on sheets of bulletin board paper. The kids will be given a basic shapes to work with that will eventually be stuffed. (Provide a variety of colors of paper. Let the student select color and shape - triangle, circle, square, oval, rectangle.) They are to decorate with cut out paper. It may be decorated in any alien fashion. While the kids are working on the aliens, cut out the matching back. Staple it to the front as they work. Leave a space to insert the shredded paper when they are completed.

Kids who finish early may design planets for the background of the display.

Helpful hint: Yes, glue sticks are so much neater to work with. However, it is my experience that white glue holds the cut out paper much better. Give the students demonstrations of how to -- and how not to -- apply glue. And, the art teacher in me flares up when students use brushes to apply glue. The brushes get ruined much quicker when glue is applied this way.

Copyright 2000, revised 2012 by Phillip Martin All rights reserved.